The great ones don’t worry about who they follow. For example, Bill Self has kept Kansas basketball fans happy since replacing Roy Williams as coach of the Jayhawks. Albert Pujols has made a decent living for his family as a St. Louis Cardinals first baseman since Mark McGwire’s retirement. The list goes on and on.


For Pratt native Steve Webster, each stop he has made in his radio career has been behind a personality who was moving on to the next level or retiring after a long, illustrious broadcast career. This pressure to perform only made Webster better as evidenced by this Saturday’s induction into the Fort Hays State University Tiger Sports Hall of Fame.


The great ones don’t worry about who they follow. For example, Bill Self has kept Kansas basketball fans happy since replacing Roy Williams as coach of the Jayhawks. Albert Pujols has made a decent living for his family as a St. Louis Cardinals first baseman since Mark McGwire’s retirement. The list goes on and on.

For Pratt native Steve Webster, each stop he has made in his radio career has been behind a personality who was moving on to the next level or retiring after a long, illustrious broadcast career. This pressure to perform only made Webster better as evidenced by this Saturday’s induction into the Fort Hays State University Tiger Sports Hall of Fame.

“What a great feeling to be recognized by Fort Hays,” Webster said of his induction. “I think this is one of the best things that ever happened to me. This is special. I poured my heart into this job and this school. It is nice to be rewarded for the hard work and dedication. This is a nice pat on the back. Very special.”

Webster’s broadcasting career began in 1983 at KWLS in Pratt. His first experience was a board shift playing records before getting the opportunity to call games as a color analyst the next year. By 1984 he had become the voice of the Pratt High Greenbacks and the Pratt Community College Beavers. Notable KWLS alumni include Mitch Holthus, formerly the voice of the Kansas State Wildcats and currently the long-time voice of the Kansas City Chiefs, as well as John Kelly, who succeeded his father Dan as voice of the St. Louis Blues in 1989.

In 1987, Webster left KWLS for KVGB in Great Bend after being recruited personally by local legend George Donnelley to be his successor. In 1989, Webster moved to Hays to become voice of the Fort Hays Tigers and Hays High Indians. Again, KAYS has a “who’s-who” list of broadcasters including Bob Davis, the voice of the Kansas Jayhawks and Kansas City Royals, and Wyatt Thompson, the voice of the Kansas State Wildcats.

All Webster did in Hays was call over 1,200 Tiger contests and his 14-years behind the microphone makes him the second longest tenured Tiger broadcaster. Webster also served as the school’s Sports Information Director for two years and, in conjunction with then athletic director Tom Spicer, helped build the Tiger Sports Network by adding stations across western Kansas.

From Hays, Webster became reunited with the Stecklein family, for whom he worked at KWLS, as the executive producer of the Mid-America Sports Network, who had recently purchased the rights to Kansas State sports broadcasts. His duties included hosting the Kansas State football pregame show as well as play-by-play of the KSU women’s basketball team. In 2006, while still with Stecklein, Webster became the play-by-play voice of the Double A Wichita Wranglers, a team featuring current Royals Zack Greinke, Billy Butler, Luke Hochevar and Alex Gordon. He also hosted radio talk shows at KGSO in Wichita, but his love of calling games has since moved him back to Great Bend where he is once again the voice of the Barton County Cougars.

But as he mentioned before, Hays, KAYS Radio and Fort Hays State is where everything fell into place for him.

“Living in Hays was the best time of my life,” Webster said. “That is where my girls grew up and still call home even though we have been gone from there several years. Those were truly special times. The football was good. Basketball won a national championship. The school was enjoying incredible growth. The growl was back in Tiger town. Knowing what I know now, I never would have left. Hays is a great community and Fort Hays State is a special place.”

Webster, a 1977 Skyline graduate, has been married to Pratt native Deb (Williams) for 26 years. They have three children, Haley (24), Stephanie (21) and David (15).

The induction will take place this Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at the Fort Hays Ballroom in the Memorial Union on the FHSU campus.