Soils are warm enough now that tomatoes can benefit from mulching. Tomatoes prefer even levels of soil moisture and mulches provide such by preventing excessive evaporation.


Mulching Tomatoes
Soils are warm enough now that tomatoes can benefit from mulching. Tomatoes prefer even levels of soil moisture and mulches provide such by preventing excessive evaporation.
Other benefits of mulching include weed suppression, moderating soil temperatures and preventing the formation of a hard crust on the soil. Crusted soils restrict air movement into and out of the soil and slow the water infiltration rate.
Hay and straw mulches are very popular for tomatoes but may contain weed or volunteer grain seeds. Grass clippings can also be used but should be applied as a relatively thin layer — only two to three inches thick. Clippings should also be dry as wet clipping can mold and become so hard that water can't pass through.
Also, do not use clippings from lawns that have been treated with a weed killer until some time has passed. With most types of weed killers, clippings from the fourth mowing after treatment may be used. If the lawn was treated with a product containing quinclorac (Drive), the clippings should not be used as mulch.
'Staggering' Sweet corn Planting
Sweet corn is one of those crops that is only "good" for a few days. If you want longer periods of production, consider staggering the planting.  In other words, plant a small block, wait a period of time, and then plant the next block.
Though it is tempting to follow a calendar schedule, such as planting a small block every week, it is better to use crop development as a trigger. If you plant on a calendar schedule, you may have noticed that later plantings often catch up with earlier ones. Instead, plant the next block of sweet corn when the previous one is one-half to one inch tall.
Thinning Excess Fruit
Many areas of Kansas have avoided late freezes resulting in a heavy fruit crop this year.
At first glance, this might seem to be a good thing. But too many fruit can cause problems that should be alleviated with thinning.
For example, a heavy fruit crop can interfere with fruit bud development this summer. This can result in a small to no crop next year. This problem most often appears with apples. Thus, thinning helps ensure that good crops are produced each year.
The second benefit of thinning is to promote larger fruit on this year's crop. Fruit trees are limited in how many fruit they can mature. Too many fruit and fruit size goes down.
A third problem often caused by too many fruit is limb damage. Sometimes the weight of a maturing fruit crop can literally break branches. Thinning will help limit weight and preserve branches. So how much thinning should we do? Thinning recommendations vary with the type of tree.             
Guidelines for fruit spacing are as follows:
• Apples and pears: Four to six inches apart.
• Peaches: Four to eight inches apart.
• Plums and prunes: Four to five inches apart.
• Apricots: Two to four inches between fruit.
These are averages and so you may have several fruit clustered closer than this distance.
As long as the average on the branch is close to the recommended spacing, the fruit should size well. Cherries are not thinned and can produce a full fruit load.