Current Pratt County Commission Chairman Dwight Adams is seeking his third term to represent the citizens of his district. Adams was born and raised in Pratt County, graduating from Cullison High School, attended Pratt Junior College and obtained a degree from Kansas State University.


Current Pratt County Commission Chairman Dwight Adams is seeking his third term to represent the citizens of his district. Adams was born and raised in Pratt County, graduating from Cullison High School, attended Pratt Junior College and obtained a degree from Kansas State University.

After completing a military obligation, Adams became involved in banking and real estate for 25-years, in several Kansas communities. In 1995, Adams, although considering himself semi-retired, came back to Pratt and took over the operation of the family farm upon the insistence of his father.

Adams is not only a successful farmer, but operates a commercial enterprise in Pratt County.

“In addition to farming, I have established a hunting preserve, which brings over one-hundred people from outside of Kansas to Pratt County,” said Adams. “These hunters do business with Pratt Regional Airport, restaurants, motels, service stations, retail stores, and other businesses in the community.”

In 2003 Adams was encouraged to run for a position on the Pratt County Commission.

“I defeated the incumbent and two other candidates and was unopposed when I ran for my second term,” said Adams. “In 2009, after approximately 70-hours of training, I achieved certification from the Leadership Academy of the Kansas Association of County Commissioners… only three to six commissioners accomplish this each year.”

During his two terms in office Adams has:

n Instituted the Capital Improvement Fund, of which $500,000 could be used to reduce the cost of a Pratt Regional Medical Center bond issue.

• Supported all county departments, while keeping taxes as low as possible.

• Supported various organizations such as the Pratt Area Humane Society, Teen Center, Blythe Fitness Center, Economic Development, Cannonball Trail Red Cross Chapter, Chamber of Commerce, Soil Conservation District, Pratt County Historical Society, B-29 Memorial and Museum, Tourism Commission, Pratt County Extension, Pratt County Fair and Livestock Sale, and Pratt County Veterans’ Memorial Lake.

• Supported a bond refinancing for Pratt Regional Medical Center (PRMC), which saved them about $80,000 a year in payments.

• Supported a second refinancing for PRMC, saving another $300,000 over the life of the bond; this was possible because of the county’s high credit rating, which is unusually strong for a county of our size.

“I feel strongly that if the citizens of Pratt County are asked to become liable, or contingently liable, for millions of dollars of debt, these citizens should first be provided with all the facts, and the majority of voters should make the decision to approve, or not approve, this debt,” said Adams. “I will wholeheartedly support the decision of the voters in any election.

“When moving to Pratt County, I was only aware that this is a great place to live, having no preconceived ideas or opinions,” he added. “Any opinions or decisions I have formed, or been involved in making, are the results of the facts I have received or observations I have made. I have never and will never be obligated to any private interest group, but only to the will of the majority.

“As a county commissioner I have felt it to be of utmost importance to be available to everyone. My cell phone number is public information, even provided my home answering machine,” continued Adams. “I have always responded to the concerns of the citizens ... How seriously I take my responsibilities is reflected by my meeting attendance, only missing two meetings in eight years, and then only due to a medical condition.

“Charles (Rinke), Joe (Reynolds), and I have spent many hours in meetings working to review the ethanol plant,” said Adams. “The issues with the ethanol plant demonstrate why spending money should be done cautiously. I believe it is the responsibility of the county commission to see that essential needs are met in the most efficient and economical way possible.

“I do not feel it is the responsibility of a county commissioner to try to sell the public on projects, but to provide facts so the public can make their own determination.”