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PrattTribune - Pratt, KS
  • More road construction to come

  • Drivers on K-64 will have to make some adjustments over the next two to three weeks while the bridge just north of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism is closed for repairs.
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  • Drivers on K-64 will have to make some adjustments over the next two to three weeks while the bridge just north of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism is closed for repairs.
    K-64 will remain open but traffic will not be allowed across the bridge during construction, said Martin Miller, Kansas Department of Transportation South Central Kansas public affairs manager.
    The $70,000 project is expected to take from two to three weeks to complete depending on the weather.
    The project is a multilayer polymer concrete overlay that is designed to protect the bridge and improve traction.
    "This is pretty common maintenance on bridge decks," said Brent Terstriep, KDOT District 5 construction engineer.
    The bridgework is the latest of several KDOT projects in Pratt County this year. Those projects include the K-64 bridge, the K-61 resurfacing project from U.S. 54 to NE 10th Street by Pratt Community College, the U.S. 281 project from Iuka to the U.S. 50 intersection in Stafford County and the U.S. 54 resurfacing project from the west Pratt city limits to the Pratt-Kiowa County Line.
    Total cost for all these projects is $12.2 million. Funding for these projects come out of the 2010 T-works bill that dedicated $7.8 billion for Kansas projects over a 10-year period.
    Work continues on the U.S. 54 expansion project in Kingman County with more work in Pratt County scheduled to start sometime early in 2013 with a tentative completion date late in 2014.
    The current Kingman County construction is also scheduled for completion in late 2014.
    The new section in Pratt County will start at the end of the four-lane portion and continue west for an additional 5.5 miles of four-lane highway from one mile east of Cairo to Waldeck.
    These U.S. 54 projects are important for Kansas and the country because U.S. 54 is a major truck route and an important multi-state corridor. The improvements also improve safety and efficiency, Miller said.
    Prior to the passage of the T-Works bill, KDOT conducted thousands of local consultation meetings to get public input on proposed KDOT projects.
    More meetings are scheduled for late September and early October as KDOT seeks more input for transportation project priorities if funding is available.
    The South Central meeting, that includes the Pratt area, is set for 9 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Sept. 27 in the Ramada Conference Center in Hutchinson at 1400 North Lorraine.
    At the hearings KDOT will provide updates on T-WORKS and KDOT. Then participants can take part in breakout sessions and offer project priorities that could be selected for preliminary engineering.
    Participants will also have the opportunity to fill out a survey on future alternative revenue sources for transportation projects.
    Page 2 of 2 - "When we get together this fall, we want to hear community leaders' thoughts on a variety of transportation-related topics," said Deputy Secretary and State Transportation Engineer Jerry Younger in a KDOT press release. "These meetings are an important part of ensuring that the T-WORKS program is understood and is working for Kansans."
    The T-WORKS program provides funds for preservation, modernization and expansion projects plus funds for transit, aviation, rail and local road projects.
    The program provides a minimum of $8 million for each of the 105 Kansas counties.
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