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PrattTribune - Pratt, KS
  • Firefighters respond to two weekend calls

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  • Some misplaced groceries and some old electrical wiring brought out firefighters Saturday morning and evening in Pratt.
    At 8:40 a.m. a daughter turned on an oven and was unaware that her mother stored pots and pans in the oven and had also placed some groceries in the oven as well.
    Firefighters had a hose line ready but took a charged extinguisher with water and foam in first and were able to put out the fire with the extinguisher.
    Fire damaged the oven and scorched the adjoining cabinets and backsplash. The house was also filled with smoke.
    No one was injured in the fire.
    Shortly after 10 p.m. that night, firefighters were called to 913 North Jackson to the report of a house on fire. When they arrived, firefighters discovered an electrical wire lying in the street in front of the house and the power off at the residence and the adjacent house to the south but no fire.
    The electrical wire on the ground connected the city power line on the east side of the street with a pole on the west side of the street in front of the house. The power lines from pole in front of the hose that ran to the house junction box were still attached to the house but badly burned.
    Terry Rennaker, owner of the house, said he was on the porch when he saw sparks shooting both ways out of the electrical wire where it connected to the power pole on the east side of the street.
    He also saw the two wires, which ran from the pole in front of his house to the electric meter, glowing bright red, an indication that they were very hot. He then saw the electrical box on the side of the house blow up and briefly catch fire.
    When the firefighters arrived that little fire was already out.
    Exactly what caused the wires to glow bright red and the wire to burn through across the street is not clear, Fire Chief David Kramer said.
    But the electrical wiring leading to the house was probably original to the house built in 1938. It was not wiring that would meet today's building codes, Kramer said.
    City of Pratt electrical worker John Giggy cut the old lines leading from the pole to the house and replaced it with new wire then replaced the wire running across the street to the city line.
    No one was injured in the incident and power was restored to both houses.
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