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PrattTribune - Pratt, KS
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas.
Preparation Makes Perfect
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About this blog
By Katie Stockstill Sawyer
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas. I married into the farming world in December 2010 and have spent every minute learning all that I can about farming and ...
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New to the Farm
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas. I married into the farming world in December 2010 and have spent every minute learning all that I can about farming and the rural lifestyle. I work in town as the marketing and communications manager for a commercial construction company, mobile occupational services company and safety consulting and training firm. In the hours outside the office, I help on the farm in any way I can – and sometimes that means just staying out of the way. This blog tracks my experiences as I learn what a life on the farm really means. I wouldn’t change this lifestyle for the world. Farmers and ranchers are some of the hardest working individuals in the world and they do what they do 365 days a year to ensure everyone has access to a safe, healthy and affordable food supply. If you want to learn more about agriculture or our operation, please don’t hesitate to contact me on this blog or at katie.sawyer@sawyerlandandcattle.com. I would love to show you around.
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By Katie Stockstill-Sawyer
May 28, 2013 11:27 a.m.



 

A baby calf relaxes in the grass as a mother and her calf enjoy the sunny spring afternoon.

A baby calf relaxes in the grass as a mother and her calf enjoy the sunny spring afternoon.



The Sawyer Farm has considerably fewer mouths to feed this Memorial Day weekend as a majority of our cattle have been moved to pasture ground in the state’s gorgeous Flint Hills region.

The cattle will spend about five months grazing green grass before returning to our farm in the fall. During their time at pasture, mother cows will continue to nurse their calves and become pregnant with a new calf, steers – or male cows– will add weight to their frames and young calves will grow with the goal of being weaned from their mothers in the fall.

One of the most important aspects of the summer grazing period is the preparation process. We take considerable care to ready our cattle for the heat, diseases and pests that roam the grasslands. We provide ear tags and insect spray that keeps flies at bay. We also immunize for diseases commonly found in grassy areas. The calves are given their first round of routine shots and all animals are branded so they can be easily identified.

Preparing and moving the cattle makes for a long and tiring week but nothing is more rewarding than seeing mother cows and calves enjoying themselves on pastures of green grass and rolling hills. We visit our cows regularly to make sure all is well, the water source is still viable and all of the animals are thriving.

We will miss the animals this summer but they will be back again in the fall to start the calving process and grow our herd once again.

Read more about cattle care and production on the Kansas Beef Council’s Beef Chat Blog at http://www.kansasbeefchat.com/

 

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