A baby calf relaxes in the grass as a mother and her calf enjoy the sunny spring afternoon.


The Sawyer Farm has considerably fewer mouths to feed this Memorial Day weekend as a majority of our cattle have been moved to pasture ground in the state’s gorgeous Flint Hills region.


The cattle will spend about five months grazing green grass before returning to our farm in the fall. During their time at pasture, mother cows will continue to nurse their calves and become pregnant with a new calf, steers – or male cows– will add weight to their frames and young calves will grow with the goal of being weaned from their mothers in the fall.


One of the most important aspects of the summer grazing period is the preparation process. We take considerable care to ready our cattle for the heat, diseases and pests that roam the grasslands. We provide ear tags and insect spray that keeps flies at bay. We also immunize for diseases commonly found in grassy areas. The calves are given their first round of routine shots and all animals are branded so they can be easily identified.


Preparing and moving the cattle makes for a long and tiring week but nothing is more rewarding than seeing mother cows and calves enjoying themselves on pastures of green grass and rolling hills. We visit our cows regularly to make sure all is well, the water source is still viable and all of the animals are thriving.


We will miss the animals this summer but they will be back again in the fall to start the calving process and grow our herd once again.


Read more about cattle care and production on the Kansas Beef Council’s Beef Chat Blog at http://www.kansasbeefchat.com/


 



 

A baby calf relaxes in the grass as a mother and her calf enjoy the sunny spring afternoon.

The Sawyer Farm has considerably fewer mouths to feed this Memorial Day weekend as a majority of our cattle have been moved to pasture ground in the state’s gorgeous Flint Hills region.

The cattle will spend about five months grazing green grass before returning to our farm in the fall. During their time at pasture, mother cows will continue to nurse their calves and become pregnant with a new calf, steers – or male cows– will add weight to their frames and young calves will grow with the goal of being weaned from their mothers in the fall.

One of the most important aspects of the summer grazing period is the preparation process. We take considerable care to ready our cattle for the heat, diseases and pests that roam the grasslands. We provide ear tags and insect spray that keeps flies at bay. We also immunize for diseases commonly found in grassy areas. The calves are given their first round of routine shots and all animals are branded so they can be easily identified.

Preparing and moving the cattle makes for a long and tiring week but nothing is more rewarding than seeing mother cows and calves enjoying themselves on pastures of green grass and rolling hills. We visit our cows regularly to make sure all is well, the water source is still viable and all of the animals are thriving.

We will miss the animals this summer but they will be back again in the fall to start the calving process and grow our herd once again.

Read more about cattle care and production on the Kansas Beef Council’s Beef Chat Blog at http://www.kansasbeefchat.com/