Monday's eclipse was almost a no show in our home, and for more than one reason. Last weekend, we gave our sole pair of eclipse glasses (left over from the 2012 eclipse) to my mother, with the intention of finding another pair or at least a welder's shade #12 or greater on our trip to [...]

Monday's eclipse was almost a no show in our home, and for more than one reason.
Last weekend, we gave our sole pair of eclipse glasses (left over from the 2012 eclipse) to my mother, with the intention of finding another pair or at least a welder's shade #12 or greater on our trip to the temple in OKC. It was not to be, however, as no place down south had either solar eclipse glasses or a welder's shade.
Fortunately, my friend Dan McAnarney came through for us with a loaned pair of eclipse glasses, a filter for a single binocular lens, and, best of all, a 2' x 4' piece of welder's shade.
Like many in Pratt who had prepared by purchasing or locating the appropriate eye ware, we were a bit dismayed about the prospect for viewing the eclipse, since clouds blocked sunshine throughout the morning.
However, the slowly disappearing sun made intermittent appearances over lunch hour. A couple of invited friends, Mike Tibbetts and Justin Sanko, also showed up before the eclipse peaked. Now, the event had become a true eclipse viewing party and it seemed that we were the only ones in the neighborhood who were looking skyward
The four of us (Kathie had joined our group by now) passed around the eclipse glasses, monocular with solar filter, and welder's shade, enjoying the view of a crescent sun filtered through the different colored lenses (orange, yellow, and green) of each piece of eclipse-ware.
Good fortune smiled on Pratt eclipse watchers as the show was nearing its peak: five or ten minutes of sun could be viewed as this star approached being 93% eclipsed by the moon. As we traded the different pieces of eye ware around, Mike noticed that the rear windshield on my wife's car perfectly reflected the unfolding eclipse. Justin, the most technologically proficient one at our party, captured a very nice image of the eclipse in the car windshield.
Sometimes you get lucky, even when skies are gray. In any case, I feel fortunate, like many of you, to have observed this rare phenomenon on a cloudy Kansas day.

Eclipse and clouds captured in the skies about Pratt around 1 p.m. on Monday, August 21. Photograph by Justin Sanko.