What do you do when you hear a strange blipping noise at 3 a.m.? Of course, you and your wife, who is already up anyway looking for her Yak Trax (the weather has been icy recently), investigate to try to locate the source of that blip. Ah ha: it's the kitchen smoke detector alarm, which […]

What do you do when you hear a strange blipping noise at 3 a.m.?
Of course, you and your wife, who is already up anyway looking for her Yak Trax (the weather has been icy recently), investigate to try to locate the source of that blip.
Ah ha: it's the kitchen smoke detector alarm, which doesn't even have a battery, because it's highly sensitive and sets off any time you boil water or burn toast. So, that fire alarm is done.
But the blipping continues, even after you've set the expiring smoke detector outside in the trash dumpster, hoping that it won't give the sanitation workers something to worry about when they collect your trash next Tuesday.
We have six smoke detectors in our home (three upstairs and three downstairs, including one which is a combination fire detector/smoke detector), as well as a dedicated carbon monoxide upstairs.
I tested batteries on all the detectors, finally determining the source of the problem. So I replaced the battery.
The time change next Sunday (March 4) provides a good annual reminder to change all of your smoke detector batteries. The recent tragedy in Pratt provides an even more vivid reminder of why it is important to have working smoke detectors. This year, in fact, I think I'll install a couple more smoke detectors in our home.
And if that blipping sound awakens you during the night, please, track down the source and replace batteries as needed or else toss that defective smoke detector to the curb and buy a new one (or call the fire department for help if you're on a tight budget).