The Basehor Historical Museum Society played host to notable Basehor resident Anna Mary Landauer, who celebrated her 99th birthday May 5. Described as an extraordinary woman who is dedicated to her church, her family and the Basehor community,

The Basehor Historical Museum Society played host to notable Basehor resident Anna Mary Landauer, who celebrated her 99th birthday May 5. Described as an extraordinary woman who is dedicated to her church, her family and the Basehor community, Landauer is a well-known Basehor icon.

Decked out in one of her signature hats that she made herself back in the 1980s, Landauer received family and friends at the reception. Basehor resident Frank Palcher added to the festive atmosphere as he provided music and played “Happy Birthday” on the accordion.

“Anna Mary was the first and only woman of Basehor,” said Pat Massengill. “There is never a dull moment with Anna Mary. She is a treasure.”

Anna Mary Doege was born in Tonganoxie and moved to Basehor in 1943 after she married her husband, Joe Landauer. She credits her longevity to some advice her doctor gave her many years ago.

“He told me to drink one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in one-quarter cup of water each day and eat beets at least once a week,” Landauer said.

That advice has served Anna Mary well. She isn’t just surviving at age 99, she is thriving and continues to be active in the community and still drives her own car. She is a member of a local quilting club and writing club. She is also a regular visitor to the Basehor Community Library, taking a variety of classes. She is an active member at Holy Angels Catholic Church and enjoys creating her sewing projects.

“Anytime there is anything going on, Anna Mary is there,” noted Ken Massengill.

Anna Mary’s sister once tried to get her to slow down and even give up her beloved sewing. While she admits that it sometimes is hard to thread the needle, Landauer can’t imagine not being able to sew one of her many projects. Anna Mary told her sister that as long as she had two pieces of fabric to sew together, she would continue creating things.

“As long as I can learn new things, I will always feel young,” Landauer said.

The Basehor Historical Museum Society dedicated an exhibit in Anna Mary’s honor earlier this spring, chronicling her amazing life and many local contributions. Part of the exhibit includes a quilt, made by Anna Mary, that captures her family history photos on the quilt blocks.

Beth Kornegay is a freelance writer covering news and events in the city of Basehor. If you have a story idea, email her at gabi_kansas@yahoo.com