Pets come and go, but each one leaves an imprint upon our hearts or maybe even helps us to learn something valuable. That was definitely the case with our recent departed cat, Tigershark, who joined the family after my youngest stepdaughter, Stephanie, had been feeding him on the sly outside our home in Hays. I […]

Pets come and go, but each one leaves an imprint upon our hearts or maybe even helps us to learn something valuable.
That was definitely the case with our recent departed cat, Tigershark, who joined the family after my youngest stepdaughter, Stephanie, had been feeding him on the sly outside our home in Hays. I came home one day, not long before we moved to Pratt, and 'discovered' the six or so month old kitten on our doorstep. I am really glad I did. Stephanie loved Tigershark and the two developed a special bond over the years before she moved away from home. Stephanie died over five years ago, so perhaps the two had a brief reunion up there.
One thing I'll always remember about Tigershark is how he helped me to understand prayer a little better. Numerous times over the years, especially on pleasant summer or spring evenings, Tigershark wouldn't always respond to my calls or be visible when I searched for him to bring him inside for the night. At such times, I would typically go inside and pray that he would return home. Almost every time, when I'd open the front door a short time later, he would be there on the porch or trotting down the sidewalk toward our home. I know that some will say that you shouldn't trouble God with trivial matters. However, I think that God is big enough to respond to all of our prayers, regardless of how insignificant these prayers may seem.
Anyway, that's my takeaway from the death of our cat. Of course, our pets provide us an opportunity, again and again, to experience death in an intimate way, just as we will all face the death of loved ones (if not already) or our own demise, eventually.