Some of the best environmentalists I've known over the years have been landowners, particularly ranchers. Sustainable ranching and farming is generally practiced by such individuals, who strive to leave the land better than they found it. If the land is ruined, for example, through overgrazing or overuse of pesticides, then there won't be much left […]

Some of the best environmentalists I've known over the years have been landowners, particularly ranchers.
Sustainable ranching and farming is generally practiced by such individuals, who strive to leave the land better than they found it. If the land is ruined, for example, through overgrazing or overuse of pesticides, then there won't be much left for children to inherit.
This principle of considering the impact of our actions today upon future generations can be traced to the constitution of the Iroquois Nation, which reads in part: 'Look and listen for the welfare of the whole people and have always in view not only the present but also the coming generations, even those whose faces are yet beneath the surface of the ground — the unborn of the future Nation.”
I believe that almost everyone wants to leave this world a better place for tomorrow's children. One way we can do this is through being good stewards of our land, air, and water.
Ranchers have been recycling for years. As an animal processes what it eats, fertilizer is created, which, by placing the animal in the right place at the right time helps the crops to grow or the grassland to be healthy. That's a principle I have learned from various ranchers, but most recently from Dale Family Farms in Protection.
Water can be recycled from doing dishes, rather than letting it go down the drain, by simply taking it outside and pouring it on the garden, trees, etc. I learned that from Betty Aldrich Altergott, who lived on the Last Stand Ranch near Wheatland, Wyoming. She likely practiced this principle all of her life. Many reading this probably saw their parents or grandparents doing the same thing.

Today, the legacy of being good stewards of our land, air, and water continues as ranchers and other landowners across Kansas work with groups like the Nature Conservancy to ensure, among other things, that significant, natural places are preserved not only as habitat for wildlife but also so that future generations will benefit from the land and its sustainable use.