Wind is both a blessing and a curse. It carries pollen to pollinate flowering plants, including certain grasses, cereal crops and trees, and it also makes you sneeze. It tears up tree houses, pulls down power lines, and mangles trampolines. And it can carry your thoughts far, far away. For eons, the wind has blown […]

Wind is both a blessing and a curse. It carries pollen to pollinate flowering plants, including certain grasses, cereal crops and trees, and it also makes you sneeze. It tears up tree houses, pulls down power lines, and mangles trampolines. And it can carry your thoughts far, far away.

For eons, the wind has blown across these Great Plains.It has been both the wind in our sails to push us onward and, likewise, whatblows us off course. It has kept millions of flies and mosquitoes from landingon us and sent as many picnic plates flying. Sometimes it whispers sweetly on abalmy summer's day; other times it howls angrily like a hungry wolf.

On many days, we wish that it would just stop, but mostlywe are thankful when it blows. For many of us, when the wind calms completelyand you can actually smell what people are cooking, we may wonder what's aboutto happen.

One favorite bit of Kansas humor goes something likethis: two guys are outside, holding onto their hats and trying to talk to eachother as tumbleweeds go shooting by. 'Do you think the wind's going to blowtoday?' one of the men loudly asks the other.

And if you think it was bad here this week, just considerthis: a weather station near Fritch, Texas recorded an 84 mph wind gust onWednesday, while another near Amarillo recorded, on the same day, sustainedwinds of 67 mph.

Now, that's windy.