It is somewhat unsettling to visit your father's grave and discover that his tombstone is laying face flat on the ground, even sunken into the earth a little That's how it was on the Sunday before Memorial Day after I drove the lonely 10 miles east of Alva, Oklahoma to the Short Springs Cemetery to […]

It is somewhat unsettling to visit your father's grave and discover that his tombstone is laying face flat on the ground, even sunken into the earth a little
That's how it was on the Sunday before Memorial Day after I drove the lonely 10 miles east of Alva, Oklahoma to the Short Springs Cemetery to lay flowers at my father's grave. He died and was buried there about two and a half years ago.
Once I saw the tombstone lying in the mud, my mind came up with all kinds of scenarios as to what had happened: 1) Perhaps an earthquake had rattled through the cemetery and caused the monument to snap off, leaving only the base in place; 2) Rainstorm after rainstorm had possibly caused the earth to settle in such a way that the tombstone had sunken and broke off; 3) Some stout person had leaned against it, causing it to fall over; 4) Someone had inadvertently ran into the monument with their vehicle, knocking it over (I did see some tire tracks nearby).
I wrote down the name and telephone number of the monument company chiseled onto the bottom of the grave marker and called their office on Tuesday morning. I explained to Barbara Carey, proprietor of Carey Monuments in Fairvew, OK, what had happened to my father's tombstone. She said that five weeks is about the maximum guarantee that any of the monument companies in the area offer on tombstones.
'We've had so much rain. They're all just settling,' she commented.
Through our conversation, I determined that my stepmother, Barbara, had called Carey Monuments three weeks ago.
'She called and said it was starting to move. When the graves are in the water, the tombstones start to move,' the monument company owner explained.

She added, 'I've got people in other cemeteries right now that are calling and asking me about moving bodies. I told them to contact the funeral homes about this.'
So, if you have loved ones buried in a low-lying cemetery or otherwise one which has flooded, you may want to check and make sure they're still there"or at the very least that their tombstones haven't tipped over.