Do you ever start the week off wrong? This past Monday morning before work, I bent over at my waist (not at the knees) to pick up a towel on the bathroom floor and suddenly felt an intense pain in my lower back. If I attempted to take a step, pain shot through my lower […]

Do you ever start the week off wrong?
This past Monday morning before work, I bent over at my waist (not at the knees) to pick up a towel on the bathroom floor and suddenly felt an intense pain in my lower back. If I attempted to take a step, pain shot through my lower back. So I stood there, holding onto the vanity, finally deciding to get down on my hands and knees and crawl into the bedroom and then, slowly, painfully, lift myself into bed. I probably overdid it last weekend, moving several heavy items upstairs from the basement to make room for window installation.
I have often told people how a stout, fit weightlifter can hurt his back by reaching down to pick up a piece of paper off the floor. That's no longer a theoretical example about the importance of lifting correctly. It's real.
I haven't called the doctor's office yet. I'm just following my wife's instructions: ice the first 24 hours and then heat after that. For a while on the first day, I even used our rollator walker to minimize the pain from walking, discovering what areas of our 1940s era home are not walker friendly. The injury seems to be improving, if ever slowly. The nights are the worst, of course, and I am awakened repeatedly by a bit of pain throughout the night as I roll over or change to the wrong position. During the day, I'm also reminded of the pulled muscle when I reach a certain way or get in and out of a vehicle. I have found a method for getting on and off the bicycle that minimizes the pain.
I'm at a point where walking or riding a bicycle don't hurt, as long as I don't twist or make any sudden movements, anyway.
For now, we'll see what tomorrow brings. I suspect this is an old injury returning to roost for a while. So I'll just try to ride it out, rubbing in icy-hot type cream and using heated wheat packs on the affected area.
As the saying goes, it is what it is.