It was Saturday evening about 5:30 p.m. I knew something was wrong when approaching the intersection at First Ave. and Stout/Rochester. A westbound car was stopped, driverless and mid-turn, a little past the turn lane, pointing south. On the other side was a bicyclist, surrounded by several people, as she crouched down and was pulling […]

It was Saturday evening about 5:30 p.m.
I knew something was wrong when approaching the intersection at First Ave. and Stout/Rochester. A westbound car was stopped, driverless and mid-turn, a little past the turn lane, pointing south. On the other side was a bicyclist, surrounded by several people, as she crouched down and was pulling at the bike's chain.
It was Kathie, my wife. Just a few minutes earlier we had been riding together, but she continued onward toward home when I stopped to pick up the mail at the post office.
'What happened?' I asked after coasting through the intersection.
'Brandon,' a gentleman began, 'I didn't see her. I thought she had the red light.'
My wife's left leg quivered as she nervously fidgeted with the chain and derailleur, stating that it was bent.
I asked her if she wanted to go to the hospital.
'What for?' she replied. 'I'm alright.'
'Do you want to go home?' I asked.
That's when the gentleman who hit her said we need to call the police and make a report.
I told her I would head home and work on the meal that was in the midst of being prepared for company coming over that evening.
Kathie returned home ten or fifteen minutes later, pushing the bicycle.
'It's not rideable,' she said. She then explained to me about the two police cars and the ambulance that had appeared after I left.
There were witnesses, fortunately, who said that the light she pedaled through, before getting hit, was green.
She said the EMTs had to check her over and also offered to transport her to the hospital.
'I told them, 'I've got to go. I have company coming over this evening,'' she said.
She returned with bumps, bruises, cuts, and, of course, some bleeding, but otherwise she is pushing through it, like the strong woman she is. In fact, she went into work at the nursing home in Cunningham on Sunday afternoon.
As for the bike, it will be taken to a Wichita bike shop for repairs.
The man who hit her felt very bad about this. I called to reassure him that Kathie was okay, that she was tough.
As for the bike, however, I told him it will need some work. This man had earlier told Kathie he would pay for repairs on the bicycle.
In the end, we're thankful that the driver behind the wheel of the car is an honest, kind soul. We are also grateful that his car was traveling at a relatively slow speed upon impact; otherwise, the outcome would have likely been much worse.