OPINION

One from the Road: Driving by landmarks can be confusing

Ron Moore
St. John News
Ron Moore writes from Stafford County where he is an over-the-road trucker, husband, father and grandfather.

My brother Walker, asked if I would stop in Tulsa, so his grandsons could see my truck. I texted him and said that I would meet them at the Quiktrip. He called me to find out which one. 

I told him, “The Stockyard exit.” He was confused. After living there for 40 years, he did not know where the Stockyard exit was. I then said that it was the east QuikTrip. 

He knew where that one was because he had driven by it thousands of times. The Stockyard sign has been standing there at that exit just as long. It may have been removed when they widened the Interstate, but it is back in place. 

I am not going to hold this against him because my mind works in a completely different way than most. I am in different towns and cities every day. After a while, street numbers and names can become confusing. 

I can remember landmarks, like the Stockyard sign. I know exactly what businesses are at that intersection. Don't ask me what street it is, because I don't know. 

My wife and daughter have called me their human GPS. If they aren't sure how to get someplace, they call me. It happened the other day. 

My daughter was coming from her mother-in-law's house. She stopped at the Quiktrip in Derby, Kansas. She wanted a frozen hot chocolate. Their machine was broken. 

I told her to keep going north and when she saw a Kwik Shop on the west side and a Dollar General across the street from it, I told her to turn there. Don't ask me what street it is. 

About a mile down, there is a traffic light and a QuikTrip is on the southwest corner. Oh, if she had not turned, she would have come across another one, but I can park my truck at this one. 

How many times have you driven down the road and seen something new that was old? All of us have. You know, that house that has been sitting there for 50 years and it finally got your attention. Walker now knows where the Stockyard sign is. 

Ron Moore writes from Stafford County where he is an over-the-road trucker, husband, father and grandfather.