Clean Line Energy Partners, out of Houston, Texas, had representatives in Kansas this past week looking into the future of building another transmission line across the state of Kansas and Pratt County. The $1.7 billion project would originate in Ford County and basically follow U.S. Highway 54 all the way to St. Louis, Mo. The project is being considered only to supply energy to the St. Louis area and there would not be any drop-offs, or any other connections along the line, according to Clean Line Energy Partners.


Clean Line Energy Partners, out of Houston, Texas, had representatives in Kansas this past week looking into the future of building another transmission line across the state of Kansas and Pratt County. The $1.7 billion project would originate in Ford County and basically follow U.S. Highway 54 all the way to St. Louis, Mo. The project is being considered only to supply energy to the St. Louis area and there would not be any drop-offs, or any other connections along the line, according to Clean Line Energy Partners.

According to Pratt County Counselor Gordon Stull, the company has filed as a public utility so they could get condemnation authority if they needed it.

There will be a plant in Ford County to convert alternating current to direct current to be sent down the line, according to Stull. The company, to be funded by venture capitalists, is looking to transmit between 3,000 and 4,000 megawatts.

“That’s quite a few 50 megawatt wind farm projects,” said Stull.

The company is claiming the project could create 5,000 construction jobs and an additional 500 operations jobs, while securing $7.0 billion in new wind farm investments.

The proposed project would provide electricity for 1.4 million homes, while generating millions of dollars in property taxes.

The estimated project benefits would include reducing water usage by over 370 billion gallons per year, reducing 12 million tons of carbon dioxide from the air, or equal to taking 1.7 million cars off the road each year. The proposal would additionally reduce the sulfur oxide from the air by 29,600 tons per year, nitrogen oxide reduction of 7,500 tons per year, and mercury reduction of 160 pounds per year, according to literature released by the company.

According to the company’s literature, “The United States possesses some of the best renewable energy resources in the world. Bolstered by these resources, the advancement of renewable energy technologies, and the need for cleaner energy, the U.S. is moving toward a clean energy economy. However, continued growth of renewable energy in the U.S. faces a serious challenge: lack of transmission.

“The existing transmission system was created primarily as a result of local utility planning, to connect population centers with nearby fossil fuel power plants. It is now insufficient to meet the demands of our new energy economy. We need long-haul transmission lines to move America’s vast renewable resources to market. Solving the transmission riddle requires a sound economic model, the right technology and an exceptional development effort, which successfully enlists the support of communities, landowners and state and local government. officials”

lean Line is developing high-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines that will deliver thousands of megawatts of renewable energy from the windiest areas of the United States to communities and cities that have a strong demand for clean, reliable energy. Clean Line will sell transmission capacity to renewable energy generators and to the buyers of the power from these wind energy projects. Clean Line’s independence from existing or planned generation and from load-serving utilities, permits a single-minded focus on meeting the needs of the project’s many stakeholders through a transparent development effort. Clean Line values stakeholder input and involvement and strives to establish and maintain close working relationships with landowners, communities, state and local government officials, customers and suppliers.