One day they were sitting there, mouths open, growing feathers daily, waiting for momma, or poppa, to regurgitate food to them. Then, they were gone, just like that. Disappeared. Three of the five house finch eggs in the nest atop our porch light, hatched. Momma, and sometimes poppa, kept busy feeding their young over the [...]

One day they were sitting there, mouths open, growing feathers daily, waiting for momma, or poppa, to regurgitate food to them.
Then, they were gone, just like that. Disappeared.
Three of the five house finch eggs in the nest atop our porch light, hatched. Momma, and sometimes poppa, kept busy feeding their young over the past few weeks. The last week or so we sometimes wondered if they had abandoned the fledglings, as we didn't see the duo much, but then, just when those thoughts had darkened our minds, one or the other parent of the baby house finches would dart from beneath the porch cover and fly into a nearby tree, if we came too close.
We sometimes watched this family drama unfold by peeking through the corner of a curtain that hid a window a few feet away from the nest. After realizing how hot our west-facing porch was getting in the heat of the late afternoon sun, I placed a couple of water bowls nearby, changing them out daily when the parents weren't around. As much as we enjoyed watching the show, we missed the most dramatic part: the flight of the fledglings!
On Wednesday, my wife and I both noticed no activity in the nest. As far as we know, the three baby finches successfully flew away from the nest. I climbed up on a bucket earlier this morning and to peek into the nest, seeing nothing. We will leave the nest where it is for a while to make sure that no other bird takes up residence there (or our house finches return).
So, like many late-spring/early summer parents of graduating seniors soon headed for college, we now have empty nest syndrome. The plus is that we can now use the front porch again.