What do you do when an anonymous stranger somewhere in cyberspace uses your debit card information to purchase almost $600 worth of merchandise? You can go boohoo, which ironically happens to be the name of the UK company where the goods were purchased using our debit card. The UK has very strict privacy laws when [...]

What do you do when an anonymous stranger somewhere in cyberspace uses your debit card information to purchase almost $600 worth of merchandise?
You can go boohoo, which ironically happens to be the name of the UK company where the goods were purchased using our debit card. The UK has very strict privacy laws when it comes to sharing information about where an order is shipped to (and to whom), even if it's your money that made the purchase. The young, likely female, offender (check out boohoo.com and you'll see how I deduced this) knew this, and she is now enjoying her $600 worth of clothing with little fear of consequences.
But, she shouldn't rest too easily because we don't readily give up.
While boohoo.com has been responsive to various e-mails to customer service, so far the company has been unwilling to provide information on the name of the person who ordered the merchandise, as well as where the stolen goods were shipped.
I filed a complaint with the Kansas Attorney General's Office on 11/27/17; an automatic e-mail informed me that we would be contacted in approximately two weeks.
Here's what happened: on 11/22/17, my wife, who checks this account regularly, noticed two charges (one for $286 and the other for $303) to boohoo.com, which she did not make or authorize. She immediately called our local financial institution and shut down this account. Nevertheless, the bank charged overdraft fees for several transactions that were processed before the account was closed.
In the meantime, she filed a request with Visa to refund the fraudulent charges. We are still waiting upon the paperwork from Visa to file an appeal. Our financial institution does not give us much hope, since the crime involves a debit card. Incidentally, bank won't refund the overdraft fees until Visa credits our account for the fraudulent charges.
What we really hope to do is prosecute the individual who caused all of this mess. After all, a crime has been committed. Hopefully, the Kansas Attorney General's Office will be able to assist us in this matter.
Stay tuned as the plot unfolds. And don't forget to check your bank accounts online regularly.
To borrow the chorus from Yes' hit song, 'It can happen:'
'It can happen to you / It can happen to me / It can happen to everyone eventually.'